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Bluetooth Speaker Lamp, Smart Touch Sensor Nigh...
48,96 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

【5 in 1 Multifunction】Bluetooth Speaker + Touch Sensitive LED Light + Alarm Clock + MP3 Player + Handsfree Calling. These features focus on this portable Bluetooth stereo speaker. When you activate the button, it is suitable for a variety of scenes, parties, outdoors, camping, night reading. 【Touch to control the light and the LED color change in 7】You need to touch the grid at the top, it has 3 brightness levels for warm light and it changes with each touch. Tap the speaker for more than 3 seconds to change the colour. It has 7 colours. The last is the color mode. Suitable for ambient light Create an atmosphere for your party, bedroom and living room. 【FM Mode and Clock and Alarm Functions】 It is not just a light and a Bluetooth speaker. With the button, the FM radio can be switched on. It also has an LED indicator. Show your time. You can also set an alarm. Remember to play beautiful music every morning when waking up. 【Long Battery Life, Switchable USB/TF/SD Card】It has a 1800 mAh

Anbieter: ManoMano
Stand: 30.11.2020
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The Calling Card Script
18,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The Calling Card Script ab 18.99 € als epub eBook: A writer's toolbox for screen stage and radio. Aus dem Bereich: eBooks, Belletristik, Erzählungen,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 30.11.2020
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Fortune Calling: The Story of Dallas Fortune: T...
9,95 € *
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Guitars. Hillbilly Music. Nashville, Tennessee. Dallas Fortune is a small-town girl with a gift for playing guitar. A member of her family has played the Grand Ol Opry since it began as a simple radio show in 1925. But, they are the minstrels, the troubadours - session players - not stars. Dallas lives her life on the road. She’s just another guitar player with a dream until she finds an antique blue mandolin in a pawn shop. Her life comes into focus as the enchantment of the mandolin captivates her audiences. The Guitar God of Nashville beckons her. Everything is there for Dallas at last, until a stage accident sends her home and shatters her dreams.Blow after blow, she fights the hand of fate. Is she destined to lose out in life? Hope, dreams, and love seem to be just out of reach. Every girl dreams of a happy ending. Will a spontaneous card reading reveal her destiny? Dallas Fortune has the best fairy godmother in country music history. Will she help make Dallas’ dreams come true?Is the future among the stars, in the cards, or locked in your heart? Fortune Calling is the first story in The Fortune series. Set in contemporary Nashville and rural Tennessee, the series chronicles the life and loves of Dallas Fortune. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Ali Lockwood. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/122265/bk_acx0_122265_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 30.11.2020
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Ask Wendy , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 304min
9,95 € *
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Go ahead... ask her anything. Over the radio and now on her popular TV talk show, Wendy Williams has always been approached for her blunt, in-your-face words of advice. How's she doin'? "Ask Wendy" has become more than just a fan-favorite TV segment; it's her calling card. Wendy has helped her viewers cope with everything from backstabbing girlfriends and deadbeat boyfriends to crazy mothers-in-law and jealous coworkers. Fans trust Wendy, even when her advice is tough to hear. She's earned her reputation as "the friend in your head." On TV, Wendy only has a few minutes to respond to each audience member, but in Ask Wendy she goes deeper, answering questions sourced from viewers across the country. No question is off-limits and no situation is too outrageous for her to take on. Wendy shoots straight from those womanly hips of hers to help you manage all the crazy that comes into your life - keepin' it real by drawing on the personal experiences that have shaped her unique perspective. Wendy reveals never-before-shared intimate secrets about struggling with weight, navigating rough times in her marriage, and learning to accept herself. Along with the usual girlfriend, boyfriend, and family drama, Wendy straight talks on topics like style, body image, and office etiquette, and of course she tackles your wildest sex questions. If you've dealt with it, Wendy has a solution for it. Filled with fun personality quizzes, Wendy's laugh-out-loud anecdotes, and tons of spot-on advice, Ask Wendy will help listeners to end the drama in their lives. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Wendy Williams. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/harp/003421/bk_harp_003421_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 30.11.2020
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The Calling Card Script
18,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The Calling Card Script ab 18.99 EURO A writer's toolbox for screen stage and radio

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 30.11.2020
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Trust Us, We'Re Experts!
19,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

The authors of Toxic Sludge Is Good for You! unmask the sneaky and widespread methods industry uses to influence opinion through bogus experts, doctored data, and manufactured facts. We count on the experts. We count on them to tell us who to vote for, what to eat, how to raise our children. We watch them on TV, listen to them on the radio, read their opinions in magazine and newspaper articles and letters to the editor. We trust them to tell us what to think, because there's too much information out there and not enough hours in a day to sort it all out. We should stop trusting them right this second. In their new book Trust Us, We're Experts!: How Industry Manipulates Science and Gambles with Your Future, Sheldon Rampton and John Stauber, authors of Toxic Sludge Is Good For You, offer a chilling exposé on the manufacturing of 'independent experts.' Public relations firms and corporations know well how to exploit your trust to get you to buy what they have to sell: Let you hear it from a neutral third party, like a professor or a pediatrician or a soccer mom or a watchdog group. The problem is, these third parties are usually anything but neutral. They have been handpicked, cultivated, and meticulously packaged in order to make you believe what they have to say-preferably in an 'objective' format like a news show or a letter to the editor. And in some cases, they have been paid handsomely for their 'opinions.' For example: You think that nonprofit organizations just give away their stamps of approval on products? Bristol-Myers Squibb paid $600,000 to the American Heart Association for the right to display AHA's name and logo in ads for its cholesterol-lowering drug Pravachol. SmithKline Beecham paid the American Cancer Society $1 million for the right to use its logo in ads for Beecham's Nicoderm CQ and Nicorette anti-smoking ads. You think that a study out of a prestigious university is completely unbiased? In 1997, Georgetown University's Credit Research Center issued a study which concluded that many debtors are using bankruptcy as an excuse to wriggle out of their obligations to creditors. Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen cited the study in a Washington Times column and advocated for changes in federal law to make it harder for consumers to file for bankruptcy relief. What Bentsen failed to mention was that the Credit Research Center is funded in its entirety by credit card companies, banks, retailers, and others in the credit industry; that the study itself was produced with a $100,000 grant from VISA USA, Inc. and MasterCard International; and that Bentsen himself had been hired to work as a credit-industry lobbyist. You think that all grassroots organizations are truly grassroots? In 1993, a group called Mothers Opposing Pollution (MOP) appeared, calling itself 'the largest women's environmental group in Australia, with thousands of supporters across the country.' Their cause: A campaign against plastic milk bottles. It turned out that the group's spokesperson, Alana Maloney, was in truth a woman named Janet Rundle, the business partner of a man who did P.R. for the Association of Liquidpaperboard Carton Manufacturers-the makers of paper milk cartons. You think that if a scientist says so, it must be true? In the early 1990s, tobacco companies secretly paid thirteen scientists a total of $156,000 to write a few letters to influential medical journals. One biostatistician received $10,000 for writing a single, eight-paragraph letter that was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. A cancer researcher received $20,137 for writing four letters and an opinion piece to the Lancet, the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and The Wall Street Journal. Rampton and Sta...

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 30.11.2020
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The Calling Card Script
24,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The calling card script is the script that expresses your voice, gets you noticed and helps you reach commission and production. Written by Paul Ashton, Development Manager of the BBC writersroom, and born out of his wide experience of reading scripts, working with writers, and as an industry 'gatekeeper', this is a guide to the key writing tools you need to know and understand to write a truly original script. As many professionals need to switch mediums and genres in order to survive and thrive, the book uniquely draws together the universal principles of dramatic storytelling for screen, stage, and radio. With a focus on the script as a blue print for performance, sections and chapters break down into bite-sized practical insights and the book mirrors both the journey of the story and process of writing it. The Calling Card Script shows how to tell a great story in script form and offers valuable professional development insight for all writers, whether established or just starting out, who wish to hone their craft and speak their voice.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 30.11.2020
Zum Angebot
The Calling Card Script
24,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The calling card script is the script that expresses your voice, gets you noticed and helps you reach commission and production. Written by Paul Ashton, Development Manager of the BBC writersroom, and born out of his wide experience of reading scripts, working with writers, and as an industry 'gatekeeper', this is a guide to the key writing tools you need to know and understand to write a truly original script. As many professionals need to switch mediums and genres in order to survive and thrive, the book uniquely draws together the universal principles of dramatic storytelling for screen, stage, and radio. With a focus on the script as a blue print for performance, sections and chapters break down into bite-sized practical insights and the book mirrors both the journey of the story and process of writing it. The Calling Card Script shows how to tell a great story in script form and offers valuable professional development insight for all writers, whether established or just starting out, who wish to hone their craft and speak their voice.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 30.11.2020
Zum Angebot
Trust Us, We'Re Experts!
18,99 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

The authors of Toxic Sludge Is Good for You! unmask the sneaky and widespread methods industry uses to influence opinion through bogus experts, doctored data, and manufactured facts. We count on the experts. We count on them to tell us who to vote for, what to eat, how to raise our children. We watch them on TV, listen to them on the radio, read their opinions in magazine and newspaper articles and letters to the editor. We trust them to tell us what to think, because there's too much information out there and not enough hours in a day to sort it all out. We should stop trusting them right this second. In their new book Trust Us, We're Experts!: How Industry Manipulates Science and Gambles with Your Future, Sheldon Rampton and John Stauber, authors of Toxic Sludge Is Good For You, offer a chilling exposé on the manufacturing of 'independent experts.' Public relations firms and corporations know well how to exploit your trust to get you to buy what they have to sell: Let you hear it from a neutral third party, like a professor or a pediatrician or a soccer mom or a watchdog group. The problem is, these third parties are usually anything but neutral. They have been handpicked, cultivated, and meticulously packaged in order to make you believe what they have to say-preferably in an 'objective' format like a news show or a letter to the editor. And in some cases, they have been paid handsomely for their 'opinions.' For example: You think that nonprofit organizations just give away their stamps of approval on products? Bristol-Myers Squibb paid $600,000 to the American Heart Association for the right to display AHA's name and logo in ads for its cholesterol-lowering drug Pravachol. SmithKline Beecham paid the American Cancer Society $1 million for the right to use its logo in ads for Beecham's Nicoderm CQ and Nicorette anti-smoking ads. You think that a study out of a prestigious university is completely unbiased? In 1997, Georgetown University's Credit Research Center issued a study which concluded that many debtors are using bankruptcy as an excuse to wriggle out of their obligations to creditors. Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen cited the study in a Washington Times column and advocated for changes in federal law to make it harder for consumers to file for bankruptcy relief. What Bentsen failed to mention was that the Credit Research Center is funded in its entirety by credit card companies, banks, retailers, and others in the credit industry; that the study itself was produced with a $100,000 grant from VISA USA, Inc. and MasterCard International; and that Bentsen himself had been hired to work as a credit-industry lobbyist. You think that all grassroots organizations are truly grassroots? In 1993, a group called Mothers Opposing Pollution (MOP) appeared, calling itself 'the largest women's environmental group in Australia, with thousands of supporters across the country.' Their cause: A campaign against plastic milk bottles. It turned out that the group's spokesperson, Alana Maloney, was in truth a woman named Janet Rundle, the business partner of a man who did P.R. for the Association of Liquidpaperboard Carton Manufacturers-the makers of paper milk cartons. You think that if a scientist says so, it must be true? In the early 1990s, tobacco companies secretly paid thirteen scientists a total of $156,000 to write a few letters to influential medical journals. One biostatistician received $10,000 for writing a single, eight-paragraph letter that was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. A cancer researcher received $20,137 for writing four letters and an opinion piece to the Lancet, the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and The Wall Street Journal. Rampton and Sta...

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 30.11.2020
Zum Angebot